Types of Standing Frames

There are many types of standing frames available. Here is a list of standing frames and how they are used proceeded by a brief description of what standing frames are.

Standing frames (or standers) are used by people with disabilities to hold them in a standing position. Standing offers many health benefits, including the prevention of pressure sores, spasms and contractures. Standing also improves the respiratory, circulatory and digestive systems.

Static (or passive) standing frames are used when the person is not able to move anywhere unassisted. This type of frame may or may not have casters to allow it to be moved from place to place. Also the person is not able to move or simulate walking, standing helps with kidney and bowel function. Standing also helps prevent osteoporosis caused by being immobile.

Dynamic (or mobile) frames are used when the person is able, or is learning, to assist at least somewhat in moving from place to place. Mobile frames are different from standing wheelchairs in that mobile frames can be moved when they are in the standing position whilst standing wheelchairs cannot. Mobile frames allow users to take part in more day-to-day activities, including cooking and classroom work. Some people can even operate machinery and perform other workplace functions.

Active standing frames allow the user to coordinate their arm and leg movements similar to a regular walking gait. These frames look like glider-style equipment in the fitness market.

There are also toilet frames that allow disabled people more independence and privacy. The person can transfer into the frame and lower and raise him- or herself. Toilet frames also decrease the risk of injuries for attendants.

While there are many companies that produce standing frames, it is important to consider the user's needs. There are manual and electric versions of most models. Other options include casters - knee, foot, arm, head, hip and side supports - chest protection, trays, adjustable positions, etc.

It is very important that the user is comfortable in the stander and that it is properly sized to his or her height and weight. Children will have to be fitted with several standing frames as they grow and mature. The supports should be comfortably cushioned in a durable material that is easy to clean.

Because of the many options and functions available, standing frames differ widely in price. To choose a standing frame, it is best to get the recommendation of a doctor or therapist. A hospital, doctor's office or rehabilitation centre will have information on funding options. Most manufacturers offer free delivery and set-up.

Standing is an important part of physical therapy. It strengthens the muscles and maintains bone density. It also helps improve the self-esteem of disabled people because by using a standing frame they can see the world from something other than "belly-button level", as some call it. The extra independence also relieves some of the caregivers' day-to-day stresses.

Standing frames are used by people with spinal cord injuries, multiple sclerosis, polio and many other disorders, as well as by stroke victims. Standing frames are a very important part of a therapy plan. More information about standing frames is readily available online.

Examples of Commonly Used Standers

Manufacturer

Upright

Prone

Supine

Leckey

Tot

Prone (old)

 

Upright

Prone (new)

 

Rise stander

Horizon

Horizon

Squiggles

Squiggles

Squiggles

Quest

UPI

 

 

Richter

 

 

Delta Advance (can also be used in recline)

 

 

Puppy

Puppy

 

Joncare

Flexistand

Bradgate

 

Jenx

Penguin

Monkey

 

Rex

Humphrey

 

Rabbit

 

 

Rifton

Prone Stander

 

Supine board

Salford

 

 

 

Chailey

 

 

 

S O S

 

 

 

Orlau

 

 

 

Kirton

Vertical

 

 

R82

 

Gazelle

 

 

Buffalo

Buffalo

Taylor Therapy

 

Whirl

 

Arjo

 

 

Tilt table

Other

Specialised Orthotic Systems
Suproboard
Oswestry Standing Frame

 

 

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